Everest and Snakey

Everest and her younger brother Gunner, couldn’t come up with a name so Snakey became the default. Gunner has the impression that Snakey belongs to him, but Everest says  he is misinformed and making false claims, and that Snakey belongs to her.  Often when people see this portrait, their reaction is to recoil, preferring to look at more palatable pet portraits I have of domestics. #dogs. I find perception fascinating, as everything is about perception. When I witness people flinching at Everest and Snakey, I am taken aback, as I find their relationship beautiful. During the shoot, there was trust, and a clear bond between the two; several frames with them nose to nose, communicating a mutual admiration. This was not something I expected from a cold-blooded reptile, and it was fascinating and touching to witness how Everest handled Snakey with such reverence. Our reactions to things is based upon our biased classifications, and this gives me reason to pause. I too, have been enlightened through meeting Everest’s pet rats Rufus and Banks, which allowed me to overcome my own prejudices and “tail fears” about rats. Now I realize, how awesome rats are as pets.

Everest and her corn snake Snakey

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About Kuo Photo

Linda Kuo is a documentary photographer whose work centers on social-environmental issues, with a focus on the impact humankind has upon nature and the animal kingdom. It is the animal that solicits Kuo's projects, and most strongly connects her to the underlying sensibilities of her work. Linda feels that animals and nature are endowed with resilient mechanisms for survival, and posses the ability to continually adapt and yield to changing circumstances. However, their innate and intelligent systems of proficiency, are continually being stressed under the actions of humankind. With simplicity and openness, she hopes to create imagery that provokes consideration towards the preservation and responsible stewardship of our environment, and the sentient beings that inhabit our world. Linda has been nominated for PDN's 30: Emerging Photographers to Watch, and her work has been featured in The New York Times, The London Sunday Times Magazine, Slate, and Photograph. Linda's photography has been exhibited at the Philadelphia Photo Arts Center, The Center for Fine Art Photography, and the Biennial of Fine Art & Documentary Photography in Barcelona among other national and international exhibitions. In addition to photography, Linda is a certified yoga instructor specializing in rehabilitation and injury, passionate about the violin, and interested in Asian culture. Linda lives in New York with her family and continues to work on her long term projects.